Menu:

December 16, 2006
Finally, A Software Architecture Primer is fully searchable on Google books!
July 20, 2006
Courseware for A Software Architecture Primer is now online! Open Courseware.
July 6, 2006

A Software Architecture Primer is now available online:
Lulu.com
Amazon.com
May 1, 2006
A Software Architecture Primer by Reekie and McAdam is now available in Australia. See the Purchasing page for more information.
We have launched our first open courseware site. It's part of a larger site that is still "under construction," but the open courseware part works fine. See Open Courseware.

Angophora Press is delighted to release the second version of the community website AudioCircle. A good deal of effort has gone in to making the transition between versions 1 and 2 smooth and trouble-free, and it has mostly paid off. Please visit AudioCircle to review an example of our "Level 2" community website software.
  1. What does online communities have to do with books?
    When we publish a book, we encourage the author to consider creating and supporting an online educational community around it. Our work and activities revolve around the creation and sharing of knowledge, and books and online communities are complementary.
  2. What is an "Angophora" anyway?
    Angophora is a genus of tree. In common usage, the term Angophora often refers to a particular species within that genus, namely Angophora costata, also known as the Sydney red gum. (*) This magnificent tree is a feature of unspoiled landscapes around Sydney and in the Blue Mountains, and plays a key role in specific ecosystems such as the Pittwater Spotted Gum Forest. It features a smooth reddish bark and sinuous curvy branches that can look eerily human. It shares with many other gumtrees the habit of dropping large dead branches, necessitating a fairly expensive trimming and maintenance regime for anyone fortunate enough to have one hanging over their house or garden.

(*) The Angophora genus is closely related to the Eucalyptus and Corymbia genera, and members of all three genera are commonly referred to as "gum trees."